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​​Roe & Co is an extraordinary expression of the very finest Irish whiskies

​Launched in March 2017, Roe & Co, blends master craftmanship, supreme quality and rich history to create a stunning new premium Irish whiskey.

Feature

Caroline Martin Master Blender

In December 2014, Diageo Master Blender Caroline Martin was given a task that would put all her 30 years of blending experience to the test: create a new premium Irish whiskey for the Diageo portfolio.

Caroline and her team spent the next two years trialling over 100 prototype blends to finally create Roe & Co, a luxuriously smooth blend of the finest quality malt and grain whiskies, all aged in first-fill ex-bourbon casks.

A rich history

Roe & Co is steeped in Dublin’s rich distilling history. It is named in honour of George Roe, the once world-famous whiskey maker and the driving force behind the golden era of Irish whiskey during the 19th century. His distillery, George Roe and Co, extended over 17 acres in the Thomas Street area of Dublin and was once Ireland's largest distillery

Roe and Co’s distinctive bottle also has its origins in the city’s distilling tradition. The bottle design is inspired by St. Patrick's Tower, a former windmill that used to power the Guinness brewery at St. James’s Gate, which was located next to the Roe and Co distillery. For hundreds of years George Roe and Co and Guinness were the two biggest names at the heart of Dublin’s historic brewing and distilling quarter.

Bottle and glass of Roe & Co. Whiskey

A new distillery for a new age

Diageo will continue to build on this rich heritage by converting the historic former Guinness Power House on Thomas Street into a new distillery.

The new St. James’s Gate distillery will be situated just a stone’s throw from the spot where the George Roe and Co distillery once stood and will begin production in the first half of 2019. Could a new golden age of Irish whiskey be on the horizon?